Commodore declared bankruptcy on April 29, 1994 and ceased to exist one of the biggest and innovative companies ever vanished from the mainstream computer market.  Commodore’s high point was the Amiga 1000 (1985). The Amiga was so far ahead of its time that almost nobody, including Commodore’s marketing department could fully articulate what it was all about. Today, it’s obvious the Amiga was the first multimedia computer, but in those days it was derided as a game machine because few people grasped the importance of advanced graphics, sound, and video.  Commodore UK was the only subsidiary to survive the bankruptcy and even placed a bid to buy out the rest of the operation, or at least the former parent company. For a time it was considered the front runner in the bid, and numerous reports surfaced during the 1994–1995 time frame that Commodore UK had made the purchase. Commodore UK stayed in business by selling old inventory and making computer speakers and some other types of computer peripherals. However, Commodore UK withdrew its bid at the start of the auction process after several larger companies, including Gateway Computers and Dell Inc., became interested, primarily for Commodore’s 47 patents relating to the Amiga. Ultimately, the successful bidder was German PC conglomerate Escom, and Commodore UK went into liquidation on August 30, 1995. In 1995 Escom paid US$14 million for the assets of Commodore International. In February 2017 an exhibition room for about 200 Commodore products was opened in Braunschweig, commemorating the European production site of Commodore which had up to 2000 employees

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