The Commodore Amiga CD32, is the first 32-bit home video game console released in western Europe, Australia, Canada and Brazil. It was first announced at the Science Museum in London on July 16, 1993, and was released in September of the same year.  In the Christmas period following its launch, the CD32 accounted for 38% of all CD-ROM drive sales in the UK, exceeding sales of the Sega Mega-CD. Despite the fact that the Commodore Amiga CD32 never became the gaming hit that it might have been, it found interesting uses among unique crowds. The CD32’s AmigaOS turned the device into a very cheap computer -which meant that some companies turned to using the console instead of buying new computers. In 1993, 109 units of CD32s were installed to run the interactive exhibits at the London Transport Museum, Covent Garden. They provided information, animations, pictures, sound and text available in several languages, as well as a London Underground simulator. Sadly, a deadline was reached for Commodore to pay 10 million USD  in patent royalty to Cad Track  for their use of their XOR patent. A  judge ordered an injunction against Commodore preventing them from importing anything into the United States. Commodore had built up CD32 inventory in their Philippine manufacturing facility for the United States launch, but, being unable to sell the consoles, they remained in the Philippines until the debts owed to the owners of the facility were settled. Commodore declared bankruptcy shortly afterwards, and the CD32 was never officially sold in the United States. About 100,000 alone sold in the Eurozone, and it could have been lot more…

More news: Generation Amiga magazine