About 2 weeks ago F-Secure started an advertisement campaign on Facebook and used a Commodore Amiga 3000(!). F-Secure has driven innovations in cyber security, defending tens of thousands of companies and millions of people. F-Secure’s security experts have participated in more European cyber crime scene investigations than any other company in the market, and its products are sold all over the world by over 200 broadband and mobile operators and thousands of resellers. In June 1990 Commodore released the Amiga 3000 workstation, the computer would be the successor of the famous and most expandable Amiga 2000. It featured improved processing speed, improved rendering of graphics, and a new revision of the operating system. The Amiga 3000 shipped with a Motorola 68030 at either 16 or 25 MHz and 2 MB of RAM. It includes the Enhanced Chip Set (ECS), a display enhancer for use with a VGA monitor, and a DMA SCSI-II controller and hard disk drive. The Amiga 3000 is the only Amiga computer to use the weird ZIP DRAM chips, which are installed vertically, rather than the usual horizontal position of most IC chips. The Amiga 3000 workstation was also the first system that would support different operating systems then AmigaOS, Commodore  had a licensing agreement with AT&T to include a port of Unix System V (release 4), which was available with the Amiga 3000UX. Three Amiga 3000 models were produced : 3000, 3000UX, and 3000T. The 3000 was the desktop model which shipped with flippable 1.3 or 2.0 AmigaOS Roms. The Amiga 3000T, released in 1991, was a tower system with built-in speaker, 32Mb RAM, high-resolution mouse, 100 Mb hard-drive, a lot of Zorro II slots, a variety of drive bays, and a 25Mhz 68030 with a 68882 math coprocessor. The 3000UX shipped with “AMIX”, Commodore’s System-5 derived UNIX which was very nice and came with X-windows. It was Commodore’s only serious attempt to get into the UNIX workstation market, and a noble effort that unfortunately failed utterly.

 

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