The first major difference is the new level names. Instead of the usual four sets of Fun, Tricky, Taxing and Mayhem levels, the 100 new screens are split into five groups of 20 with the names Tame, Crazy, Wild, Wicked and Havoc. On loading the levels it doesn’t take long to notice that all the scenery graphics and tunes have been changed. The general style is similar on many of the screens, involving red-brick towers and metallic obstacles, but some of the new scenery is very different.

There are, for example, rocky caves with writhing patches of weeds, snowy scenes complete with Swiss-chalet shaped exits and surreal landscapes with mounds of bubble-shaped obstacles to overcome. The music has been improved quite a bit, sounding just as wacky and jolly as ever, but with a more cleanly-produced feel. Oh No! More Lemmings is primarily geared towards giving established players some more levels to have a go at, and the ensuing puzzles are extremely hard.

The Tame levels are, as you can guess, fairly tame. Yes, I had trouble with them but then I never was any good at the original. These levels can be breezed through by yer average Lemmings supremo, and so they’re best for people who’ve bought the standalone version and don’t know what they’re doing yet. After that, things get harder and some of the levels are destined to go down in history as complete bar stewards of our time. The Superlemming level, for instance, looks really easy but the timing needed is phenomenal. Scary stuff. And the others pose similar seemingly impossible tasks that kept us from the pub for many lunchtimes. Well, almost. There’s not much else to say, really. If you’re a Lemmings fan then this is just the thing to keep you awake until God knows when 🙂

news source: various sources /image source: GenerationAmiga / watch on Youtube / download Oh No! More Lemmings Amiga, MS-DOS, Atari

More news: Generation Amiga magazine