The arrival of Myst on the Amiga, even when you ignore the time that’s elapsed since the rest of the world got it(1993), was certainly a major event in 1998. However, it’s still one of the best adventure games to have been released on the Amiga. Even if you’re not really interested in adventuring, you’ll find Myst to be thoroughly engaging. The clever and subtle way the game reveals its secrets makes it hard to leave and the way the whole story is woven together makes you keen to learn more.

The experience of Myst revolves around a man named Atrus and his rather unusual books. Atrus is an avid scholar and scientist – a true renaissance man. It’s often said a good book that it makes you feel like you’re in a different time and place – but Atrus’ books really DO take you to a different time and place. That’s how you wound up, disoriented and aimless on the seemingly deserted island of Myst. A catastrophe has befallen Atrus and most of his books – but some remain, waiting to be discovered by you, to transport you to other lands where you can piece together the information and evidence you need.

For you, the player, you have only the mouse at your disposal. Myst does revolve around puzzles, but they’re typically not of the “Use object X on object Y” variety. Rather, you have to learn, read, record and interpret what you see around you and can cull from Atrus’ record, and then figure out how it might be relevant to a particular roadblock. The worlds of Myst you will visit have their own internal logic, as does the game. Discovering that logic is another part of the joy, along with being an appreciative spectator. The game really does make you think. On the other hand, the global proliferation of Myst means that if you DO get stuck, help is never very far away.

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