The Commodore Amiga 600 was launched March 1992 and is officially 25 years old! It was codenamed “June Bug” after a B-52s song, and is Commodore International’s final model based on the Motorola 68000 CPU and the ECS chipset. It was intended by Commodore to revitalize sales of the A500-related line before the introduction of the 32-bit Amiga 1200. The A600 was supposed to be 50–60 US$ cheaper than the A500, but it came in at about that much more expensive than the famous Commodore Amiga 500. An “A600HD” model was sold with an internal 2.5″ ATA hard disk drive of either 20 or 40 MB. This model was marketed as a more “scholarly” version of a home computer, previously best known for its extensive range of games, and retailed at almost double the price of a standard A600. The A600 is the first Amiga model that was manufactured in the UK, the factory was in Irvine, Scotland. The Commodore A600 is the first of only two Amiga models to feature a PCMCIA Type II interface. The Commodore Amiga 600 discontinued one year later in 1993 and Commodore sold about 300,000 units, mostly in Germany 193,000 units.

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